Our Approach

When we work we strive for real community engagement and long-term impact

Planning and needs assessment
We listen well to people telling us about their needs. We assess their claimed needs and do in-depth research. Most importantly, we engage the community in need to learn directly from them about their needs and situation.
Based on research and community engagement, we propose potential new solutions that can prove radically useful for the people in need. Things we consider include the potential for greater impact, buy-in and ownership of the affected people, duplication of work of other organizations, and long-term viability of the proposed intervention.

We look for donors passionate about the given need and proposed solutions

We engage the community (again) in what we call Community Based Targeting (CBT). We use it in the selection of beneficiaries for all project interventions. This approach involves conducting intensive community sensitization sessions and open discussions on the social and economic dynamics of an area. The various components of the project are discussed in detail as we seek input from the community on how they can be implemented.

The community members are then called on to contribute to the development of criteria for the identification and selection of the beneficiaries. We have found this to be a very effective tool in ensuring that only the most vulnerable persons and households are selected. It also makes the entire process tremendously transparent. Using CBT, we are able to eliminate aspects of favouritism and nepotism that so often cause conflicts and poor community participation. Thus we ensure that the proposed project solution is relevant and owned by the community.

Implementation and monitoring
We begin to implement the project. This involves developing a detailed implementation plan that will guide all project activities.

We bring together all relevant stakeholders such as local government officials, other organizations working in the area, and the community members themselves.

We monitor/stay involved. Our field staff reports regularly to us about the progress of the project. They also openly share with us the challenges that the project faces.

We document and communicate the progress and setbacks of the project to our donors, supporters, and other relevant stakeholders. This includes regular updates, as well as the final evaluation after all activities have been completed.”

Evaluation

We listen well/engage (again) to the people in need to document their progress and the lessons learned.”

We stay in touch. In most cases we are able to stay in touch with the people we have helped even long after the project ends – this helps greatly when we develop future proposals and when we assess the long-term impact of our solutions.”


CHANGING LIVES THROUGH WATER AND FOOD

Enhancing Food Security in East Kenya (EFSEK) Project

Purpose:

Kitui County, despite its proximity to Nairobi, is plagued by inconsis tent rain and dry conditions throughout the majority of the year.

Our goal in this project is to increase the water and food security, and drive economic development of the rural population. We focus on improving water and food security, commercializing of the rural economy, and creating an environment that enables increased water and food security and economic growth. The impact of EFSEK will be felt for years to come.

Team:

Eric and Johnson are great guys.

Impact:

Direct beneficiaries – 300 households

XXX indirect beneficiaries

To find out what exactly the term direct beneficiary means,

Location:

GPS Coordinates 34.772, 34 46’ 19”
Eastern Province: Kitui County: Waita and Kanyangi

History:

EFSEK is part of a five year, multi-sector project, funded by the DGIS of the Netherlands. ADRA Kenya, along with SNV, World Vision and Caritas all work together to make a difference in the lives of people in Kitui County.

Partners:

The EFSEK Project is the brain child of the World Agroforestry Centre (or ICRAF), and is funded through the DGIS of the Netherlands.

Funding:

$152 000 per year


CHANGING THE LIVES OF YOUNG GIRLS

Anti-Female Genital Mutilation (Anti-FGM) Project

Purpose:

There’s no nice way to put it – female genital mutilation (FGM) – in volves the non-therapeutic partial or total removal of female genitals. (might need to alter that definition to suit what our proposal says)

Thousands of girls in Kenya are still vulnerable to this cultural tradi tion, which continues to be practiced in parts Western Kenya. We rec ognize that securing the future for girls in Kenya, means tackling FGM from multiple angles, and this is exactly how ADRA Kenya’s Anti-FGM project works.

We provide school fee assistance to runaway or vulnerable girls, who are feeling threatened by FGM in their community. We’re also piloting a church-based approach, which has seen multiple churches intro duce anti-FGM curriculum into their teachings and services. Our team also works in conjunction with Area Advisory Councils and local county authorities in educational workshops, and alternative rites of passage ceremonies.

Team:

Mary is the project manager for our Anti-FGM project based in Kisii.

Impact:

Direct beneficiaries – 9840 people

XXXX Indirect beneficiaries

To find out what exactly the term direct beneficiary means, click here

Location:

GPS Coordinates 34.772, 34 46’ 19”
Nyanza Province: Nyamira, Kisii Central, Kisii South, Gucha, Kuria East & West and Transmara Districts, Western Kenya (Kisii, Kuria, Kipsigis and Masaai communities)

Partners:

Our Anti-FGM project is fully funded by Lakarmissionen, a Swedish consortium of donors.

Funding:

$120 680 per year


CHANGING LIVES THROUGH EDUCATION – FOR KIDS AND ADULTS!

Child Education Support and Development (CESAD) Project

Purpose:

Western Kenya has one of the highest rates of HIV and AIDS. This has left many children orphaned and vulnerable, and without a safety net to fall back on. Among other things, this means that the children lack enough food and miss out on school.

ADRA Kenya’s CESAD project aims at two things. First, we put orphaned and vulnerable children back in school. Second, we empower their caregivers through income generating activities, allowing them to adequately support their families into the future.

Team:

Benter – she’s the capable woman leading CESAD’s work.

Impact:

Direct beneficiaries – 600 households with Orphans and Vulnerable Children

XXXX Indirect beneficiaries

Location:

GPS Coordinates 34.772, 34 46’ 19”
Nyanza Province: Nyamira, Kisii, Gucha,Rachuonyo and Suba areas

Partners:

Our long term friends and partners, Lakarmissionen fund CESAD and make sure that children have access to education.

Funding:

$ 183,805 per year


CHANGING LIVES OF THE DROUGHT-AFFECTED

Food Today and Tomorrow for Mandera (FTTM) Project

Purpose:

Mandera is a dry, hot and isolated place. Water is scarce and drought is ever present.

ADRA Kenya’s FTTM Project empowers families through a two-pronged approach: food aid and gardening. Through food aid, we give the communities who are recovering from drought the strength and energy to participate in trainings and achieve the best from gardening activities.

And while gardening seems simple, in a place where livestock is the number one priority, vegetables are an unknown and water is like gold, the right kind of gardening is life-changing.

We train families in how to build and maintain multi-storey gardens (MSG) and kitchen gardens. These gardens, which require minimal water, produce nutritious tomatoes, kale, spinach (and much more!) which can be harvested year round.

As a result, families who traditionally didn’t eat green leafy vegetables are healthier and less vulnerable to drought. Plus, they now have another source of income.

Team:

Bashir and David bravely working in Mandera and seeing lives changed.

Impact:

Direct beneficiaries – 500 Households or 3,674 people

XXXX Indirect beneficiaries

To find out what exactly the term direct beneficiary means,

Location:

GPS Coordinates 34.772, 34 46’ 19”

Mandera West is one of the poorest sub-counties in Kenya with absolute poverty of 65% as compared to the national absolute poverty of 45%. Food security is a chronic problem in the sub-county due to low, unreliable rainfall and sporadic droughts. The sub-county was severely affected by the 2011 Horn of Africa drought, resulting in massive loss of livestock – the communities’ main livelihood

 History:

Our FTTM project is our second development project based in the north of Kenya. It follows our emergency response in 2011, and the Mandera Central Recovery Support Project which ended in 2013.

Partners:

This project is funded by ADRA Canada and the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

Funding:

CA $ 354,495.91

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CHANGING LIVES THROUGH BUILDING RESELIENCE TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Building Reselience Against Climate Effects (BRACE) Project

Purpose:

How do I continue farming and providing for my family when the rains are no longer consistent or enough to keep my crops growing?

Each year, more and more families in Mwingi (Kitui County, Kenya) face this question. Consecutive failed rainy seasons coupled with unpredictable weather mean traditional income streams, like agriculture farming, are increasingly strained.

Through this project we see community-driven ideas put into action; allowing families to establish diverse business and farming opportunities and give them a chance to earn consistent income no matter what the weather brings.

The BRACE project features many components – kitchen gardens (ensuring families can still grow the nutritious vegetables they need), soap making (using natural and local products) and basket weaving (using masters basket weavers and the local sisal product) – all of which help families diversify their income and brings financial stability.

Team:

Sylvester and Aaron manage the project from our Mwingi office

Impact:

Direct beneficiaries – 400 households or 2400 people

XXXX indirect beneficiaries

Want to know exactly what is the difference between direct and indirect beneficiaries? click here

Intresting Facts:

The area has bi-modal rainfall, and has historically received 574mm of precipitation annually (the majority in April and November), however last year Mwingi Central received only 414mm. The riverbeds in the area are dry eleven months per year!

 History:

BRACE is a continuation of our completed Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) Project, which was based in the same location in Mwingi from 2012-2014. These projects furthered the work of ADRA Kenya’s 2011 Horn of Africa disaster response, funded by ADRA Australia.

Location:

GPS Coordinates 34.772, 34 46’ 19”

Mwingi Central Sub-County, is located 170km from the capital of Kenya, Nairobi. It has a population of 83,687.

Partners:

BRACE is fully funded through our partner office ADRA Germany (ADH East Africa Funds, ADH DRR Funds).

Funding:

27 552 EUR, 144 262 EUR

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